You get back what you give out

When she was seventy‑one, Golda Meir became prime minister of Israel and governed for five years, including the period of the Arab‑Israeli War. With a dedicated heart, she worked assiduously for peace, meeting with world figures such as Egyptian president Anwar Sadat and Pope Paul VI. Known affectionately in Israel as “Golda Lox,” she was much loved and respected by her people.

Golda Meir’s story is a good example of receiving back what we give out. Her sincerity, integrity, loyalty, and strong desire for peace flowed from her like a mighty magnet to draw these attributes from others. During the negotiations with the Arabs, Mrs. Meir insisted on
meeting her opponents face to face. A journalist suggested that this was not necessary. “Even divorces are arranged without personal confrontation,” he argued. To which Mrs. Meir retorted, “I’m not interested in a divorce, I’m interested in a marriage.”

You are present in your life on earth at this moment for the purposes of living, loving, learning, and growing. Be assured that life can reliably provide a wide variety of adventures, experiences, and situations that may require you to draw from the depths of your being. Your level of self awareness and manner of expression can determine the quality of living you experience. Why? Because you get back what you give out.

It is wise to embark on a personal program of self‑development, greater understanding of the laws of life, and self‑discipline. Science of Mind founder Ernest Holmes said once in a class lecture, “What you are looking for, you are looking at, and you are looking with.” And an anonymous quote states, “Projection often makes perception. The world you see is what you give it. It can be the witness to your state of mind, the outside picture of an inward condition. Therefore, seek not to change the world, but choose to change your mind about the world.”

Within you is the power to meet life and all that lies before you with unshakable assurance. If you truly believe this, you can radiate a confidence that draws greater good into your life. To repair a watch requires the use of delicate instruments. Adjusting the affairs of life by the use of spiritual principles also requires the use of delicate instruments. The person who tries to get things done in a hurry in the ordinary manner is like a man trying to repair a watch with a hammer. Employment of the laws of life can bring peace, harmony, abundance, and well‑being into your world.

Many people seem needlessly to make their lives difficult by failing to realize the importance of the attitudes they send out. We may mistakenly think we live in the world—in our physical environment. In reality, we live in our minds. We move through a world of physical facts, but we do our real living in our mind. For some, it may be a perfectly miserable afternoon with people pushing, cars cutting in on them, and traffic directors favoring every line of cars except the one they are in. For others, the afternoon can be sparkling with adventure and happiness with people acting courteously and friendly, and everything flowing smoothly.

Have you ever gotten up on “the wrong side of the bed,” perhaps in a grumpy mood, only to find other people seeming to be in that same discordant mood. Then, perhaps you made a conscious effort to become more positive and appreciative and found others responding in a like manner. You could have simply been “getting back what you were giving out.”

Begin cleaning out those things in your mind that you know make for more problems, such as resentment, self‑pity, blaming others, anger. We pay a high price for this kind of self‑indulgence. It may not be bothering the other person, but it can sure raise havoc with our hearts and stomachs and who knows what else. Become more aware of the kind of emotions you may be sending out. The Roman philosopher Seneca perhaps said it best, “Live among men as if God beheld you; speak to God as if men were listening.” Then you can know that what you are giving out is your best!